Bnonn Tennant (the B is silent)

Where a recovering ex-atheist skewers things with a sharp two-edged sword

Thorny problems with karma #5: the sustainability paradox

Even assuming karma can get started in the first place, how does it keep going while still letting off enough steam to allow everyone to eventually escape?

Thorny problems with karma #4: the bootstrap paradox

How did the whole system of karma get started in the first place, without violating its own rules, or requiring an infinite number of people or infinite amount of time?

80/20 arguments for God: the Why and Wherefore argument, part 2

Once we have the conclusion that something made physical stuff, there are at least 10 things we can infer about what that “something” must look like…

80/20 arguments for God: the Why and Wherefore argument, part 1

This first argument is both easy and persuasive because it makes good intuitive sense. It involves finding the most likely answer to why there is something rather than nothing.

80/20 arguments for God: introduction

In which I introduce a new series on the easiest and most effective arguments for God’s existence.

Thorny problems with karma #3: charity is selfish and inconsiderate

Why should we take karmic worldviews seriously when they encourage cruelty and indifference over charity and mercy, and have produced the most backward, poverty-stricken cultures in the world?

Thorny problems with karma #2: who sets the rules?

If karma is basically a system for balancing your morally bad choices, who exactly is it that makes the moral rules you must follow?

Thorny problems with karma #1: what makes it tick?

Is karma a process which must be intelligently guided? If so, who does the guiding?

On the atonement, part 6: unlimited satisfaction fails to actually accomplish redemption for anyone

Part 6 of 6, in which I consider and confute the objection that an unlimited satisfaction would not actually secure or guarantee salvation for anyone.

On the atonement, part 5: universal salvation, or double payment

Part 5 of 6, in which I refute the objection that unlimited satisfaction entails either universal salvation, or a double payment for sins.

On the atonement, part 4: God’s desires frustrated?

Part 4 of 6, in which I interact with the objection that unlimited satisfaction requires that God be at cross-purposes with himself, entertaining frustrated desires which he cannot fulfill.

On the atonement, part 3: the objective grounds for faith

Part 3 of 6, in which I forward the argument that limited satisfaction undermines the assurance of salvation at exactly the times we most need it, by removing the objective grounds for faith.

On the atonement, part 2: the grounds for the universal gospel call

Part 2 of 6, in which I argue that limited satisfaction is inconsistent with the universal gospel call—whether conceived of as an invitation, or as a command only.

On the atonement, part 1: headship and imputation

Part 1 of 6, in which I show that limited satisfaction is inconsistent with what is revealed in Scripture about federal headship and forensic imputation: two doctrines central to Jesus’ penal substitution.

On the atonement: introduction

In which I introduce the case I will forward for a particular redemption grounded in an unlimited satisfaction on the cross.